How Google Converted Language Translation Into a Problem of Vector Space Mathematics

…a technique that automatically generates dictionaries and phrase tables that convert one language into another. The new technique does not rely on versions of the same document in different languages. Instead, it uses data mining techniques to model the structure of a single language and then compares this to the structure of another language. “This method makes little assumption about the languages, so it can be used to extend and refine dictionaries and translation tables for any language pairs,” they say.

How Google Converted Language Translation Into a Problem of Vector Space Mathematics | MIT Technology Review (via greglinch)


journo-geekery:

What inner city kids know about social media, and why we should listen — I.M.H.O. by Jacqui Cheng.
Great stuff in this.

When we tried to walk the students through the privacy settings on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other services, the kids were outright bored. (This was not the case for other sessions I taught, such as one on getting started with HTML. That one ended up being wildly popular, especially among the girls in the class.) Instead, they told us they already knew how to do all those things; their real problems with social media came from password hacks that allowed others to hijack their accounts and be abusive to others while posing as them. The same problem that, let’s be honest, we all face.

journo-geekery:

What inner city kids know about social media, and why we should listen — I.M.H.O. by Jacqui Cheng.

Great stuff in this.

When we tried to walk the students through the privacy settings on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other services, the kids were outright bored. (This was not the case for other sessions I taught, such as one on getting started with HTML. That one ended up being wildly popular, especially among the girls in the class.) Instead, they told us they already knew how to do all those things; their real problems with social media came from password hacks that allowed others to hijack their accounts and be abusive to others while posing as them. The same problem that, let’s be honest, we all face.



Dance review: Alchemy, Lindsey Matheis

Much like Lindsey Matheis is trying to do with her show, I hit the creative brink while writing this.

I wrote it in the evening and then woke up in the morning realizing I hated it. The rewrite was quick and maybe too informal, but my editors took most of overly-conversational language out, probably rightfully. (However I do very much hate the revision of “God knows” to “Goodness knows”).


The Media Audit names radio stations', clusters' web sites with highest metro reach | RAIN: Radio And Internet Newsletter

My current place of employment Oregon Public Broadcasting is killing it in online traffic. Nearly 20 percent reach!

Top honors for a single station belongs to public radio KOPB-FM/Portland, OR. More than 385-thousand adults of a metro population of roughly two million have visited the site in the past 30 days. The Media Audit says this reach, a whopping 19.8% of Portland’s 18+ metro population, is the highest of any station site it studied. No other single station’s site topped 6.2% reach.

In July, The Media Audit reported KOBP-FM has the second highest unduplicated combined on-air/web reach, 27.4% of the Portland, OR metro (San Jose KQED ranked first). At that time, the site reached nearly 22% of the adult metro population in 30 days (RAIN coverage here).


About those "slam dunk" sources

  • White House spokesman Josh Earnest: I leave it to you to decide whether or not you believe anonymous quotes that are included in AP stories, or an on-the-record statement from people who have looked at exactly the same information and reached a different conclusion.
  • AP correspondent Julie Pace: You guys talk to us anonymously all the time.
  • Earnest: I'm just saying that anonymous sources -- what you also say to me on a regular basis when I and others speak anonymously to you is that you place more credibility in on-the-record statements, right?
  • via The Hill: http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/319485-white-house-spokesman-comes-under-press-fire-for-criticizing-anonymous-sources

theatlantic:

The Rad New Words Added to the Dictionary in the ’90s: Where Are They Now?Poking fun at new words added to various dictionaries is a time-honored journalistic tradition, nearly as well-loved as writing about nomenclature after the Social Security Administration’s annual release of the country’s most popular names.
And for good reason: Everyone uses words and everyone has a name. It doesn’t get more universal than the language we share. So, today, when the Oxford Dictionaries Online (not the OED) added bitcoin and hackerspace and emoji and TL;DR, everyone had some fun arguing about whether all the additions were appropriate. On one side are the traditionalists, who would prefer English remain the same as it’s always been, where “always” is defined as whenever that person was 23. On the other side are the people who are right. This is literally a never-ending debate, and yes I just used literally to mean figuratively and you still knew what I meant.
But, question! Many of the words entering our dictionaries have a distinctively technological flavor. They are things we use to describe our interactions with machines, or are used almost exclusively in mediated realms like Gchat. So, if our language is being partially forced to find new ways to say things because we can do new things with technology, and we know technology obsolesces, then are we naming actions and ideas that will only exist until the next upgrade comes out?

Read more.

theatlantic:

The Rad New Words Added to the Dictionary in the ’90s: Where Are They Now?Poking fun at new words added to various dictionaries is a time-honored journalistic tradition, nearly as well-loved as writing about nomenclature after the Social Security Administration’s annual release of the country’s most popular names.

And for good reason: Everyone uses words and everyone has a name. It doesn’t get more universal than the language we share. So, today, when the Oxford Dictionaries Online (not the OED) added bitcoin and hackerspace and emoji and TL;DR, everyone had some fun arguing about whether all the additions were appropriate. On one side are the traditionalists, who would prefer English remain the same as it’s always been, where “always” is defined as whenever that person was 23. On the other side are the people who are right. This is literally a never-ending debate, and yes I just used literally to mean figuratively and you still knew what I meant.

But, question! Many of the words entering our dictionaries have a distinctively technological flavor. They are things we use to describe our interactions with machines, or are used almost exclusively in mediated realms like Gchat. So, if our language is being partially forced to find new ways to say things because we can do new things with technology, and we know technology obsolesces, then are we naming actions and ideas that will only exist until the next upgrade comes out?

Read more.